No more business as usual. Tell the Senate to stop FERC now

We live a in climate changed world. From the wildfires out west to the hurricanes in the east — one making landfall this week while four more are active offshore. So why is Congress rushing to approve more Trump nominees to key energy agencies like the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC)? What, exactly, would it take to convince Senators to just STOP the madness and extraction?

The Senate Energy Committee, once again, is considering new nominees to serve as commissioners at FERC. And FERC has continued its work rubber stamping new fossil fuel infrastructure all through the pandemic. We’ve called and written them thousands of times: Most recently some 40,000 of us asked FERC not to extend a permit for the Mountain Valley Pipeline.

But FERC won’t stop until Congress stops them by instituting real reforms. Will you tell the Senate Energy Commitee that this is no time for Business as usual – and demand they stop the nomination of two new FERC Commissioners this week?

Call nowCall the Senate switchboard 202-224-3121 & tell them to vote NO on all new FERC Commissioners until there are real reforms!
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The entire west coast is on fire. Hurricane Sally is making landfall today in the Gulf, even as communities re still struggling to recover from Hurricane Laura, which itself made landfall on the 15th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. And the Mid west is still trying to put itself back together after a massive derecho (a sort of one-directional tornado) and back to back storms that produced massive flooding.

Donald Trump continues to spout his nonsense and ignore science. But it’s his enablers – the agency heads and administrators that keep rolling back climate regulations and rolling out the red carpet for more fossil fuels extraction and infrastructure – who do the real damage.

The two newest nominations — Allison Clements and Mark Christie — aren’t as bad as some of the people Trump has nominated in the past. But that’s hardly the point: As long as Trump and his cronies are calling the shots, FERC will never be an agency that supports real climate action. We need bold changes, like a Green New Deal that changes FERC in to a Federal Renewable Energy Commission – and that change could be coming soon.

But until those changes come, we stand with our allies at Beyond Extreme Energy in calling upon Senators to abstain from voting for either of these nominees. Next week there will be a people’s hearing on FERC’s numerous offenses against the climate, our communities, and people. That needs to be followed quickly by real reform legislation that Congress can vote on FIRST, before they continue to feed the Fires of FERC’s climate disaster.

Laura, Katrina & a chemical fire: Katrina 15 anniversary

Tomorrow marks Katrina 15, a decade and a half of ongoing recovery from Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf South. And just as organizers were gathering to mourn, remember, rally and act together – Hurricane Laura slammed into the petrochemical hub West of New Orleans.

Today, thousands are without access to power, or clean water and at least one chemical plant was still burning Thursday evening. That means, as one New Orleans ally just explained to me, that people who lost their roof in the storm are being told to stay ‘indoors’ because the air outside is toxic.

The profound level of environmental and climate in-justice that permeates this moment is hard to take. But community leaders from across the Gulf South have been planning for months to commemorate the 15th anniversary of Katrina.

In the wake of Hurricane Laura, and the unfolding tragedies in its wake, we invite you to join them for a day and honor the sacrifice of the region in the global fight for climate justice.

Here’s an update in their words:

In solidarity with our family recovering from Hurricane Laura which made landfall on the Louisiana central coast this week, we are shifting our #Katrina15 programming to center the frontlines impacted by Hurricane Laura, offer lessons learned from 15 years of ongoing recovery from Hurricane Katrina, and share disaster recovery resources and ways to stand in solidarity with communities in Louisiana and Texas. Register here to join us for an abbreviated virtual program, Saturday, Aug. 29, 2020 at 10amCDT.

If you’re able, we encourage you to also make a donation to support frontline groups in Louisiana and on the Gulf coast who are rendering direct, mutual aid to impacted people and communities. Our friends have begun compiling a list and there should be more information on the call tomorrow at 10amCDT.

Thanks for signing – Can you help these local PR groups?

Thanks for signing our petition Below are some tools to share the action with your networks online. Because Congress isn’t able to send the full aid package quickly, we’re also including links to some local groups in Puerto Rico. If you wan to bypass the racist Trump regime and fund direct aid to the people who need it, these are some places to start.

share on Facebook
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Or, email this link: 
http://bit.ly/2020PRAid_198m 

This list is copied from a REmezcla article by Raquel Reichard. Thanks to her for writing and to Friends of the Earth friends who shared it with us.

Ayuda Legal PR

Ayuda Legal PR is a nonprofit organization that provides free and accessible education and legal support to low-income people and communities in Puerto Rico. Following Hurricane María, the group, made up of lawyers, legal experts and law students, began focusing on legal assistance during and after disasters, particularly access to justice, the right to housing and fair recovery — all of which will undoubtedly be needed for people rebuilding houses and businesses, seeking health care and more after the earthquakes. Donate here.  

Brigada Solidaria del Oeste

Also born out of the devastating 2017 storms, Brigada Solidaria del Oeste is a community initiative comprised of individuals from various organizations, creative spaces and social struggles that meets with members of communities on the island’s west coast to identify the needs of the people and work to support them. Currently, group leaders are headed south, where the earthquakes and aftershocks were felt the most, to speak with locals, assess needs and help communities on the ground. Donate to the brigade via PayPal through their email address brigadasolidariaoeste@gmail.com. 3

Casa Pueblo

On the archipelago, Casa Pueblo is a community-management project that has been addressing climate change since 1980, when the government attempted to mine deposits of silver, gold and copper, by protecting natural, cultural and human resources and advocating for a more environmentally friendly and sustainable Puerto Rico. Their efforts and education are particularly crucial as the island is increasingly hit with natural disasters. In fact, in December, think tank Germanwatch released its annual Global Climate Risk Index 2020, which found that Puerto Rico is affected by climate change more than anywhere else in the world. Donate to Casa Pueblo here

Correa Family Foundation

Created by Puerto Rican professional baseball player Carlos Correa, the Correa Family Foundation is a nonprofit foundation that supports low-income and/or ill children. Correa, a shortstop for the Houston Astros, was in his hometown of Ponce, which was hit hard during the earthquake, with his wife Daniella Rodriguez Correa at the time the 6.4 magnitude quake hit. On Twitter, Rodriguez said she has “never been so scared in my life,” while Correa told CBS affiliate KHOU 11 “there’s a lot of victims.”

With multiple schools affected by the series of quakes, including an institution in Guánica that was destroyed, Correa started a fund through his children-oriented foundation to help rebuild impacted schools. Donate here

World Central Kitchen & Comedores Sociales de Puerto Rico

While Spanish chef José Andrés’ World Central Kitchen, a nonprofit, nongovernmental organization providing free meals to people in the wake of natural disasters, isn’t native to Puerto Rico, the group works with local chefs and community leaders to help those in impacted areas. After Hurricane María, World Central Kitchen served more than 3,000,000 meals and is often applauded on the archipelago for its quick and impactful disaster relief. In a tweet on Tuesday, Andrés said that his team is heading to the southern coast of Puerto Rico, where they will be using solar power and generators to serve affected municipalities. Donate here.

If you prefer to support local food initiatives, Comedores Sociales de Puerto Rico, a project of Centro para el Desarrollo Político, Educativo y Cultural (CDPEC), is a self-managed food distribution initiative providing free meals to communities at the University of Puerto Rico’s Río Piedras and Cayey campuses. Donate here.

Trump’s racist, climate denying Puerto Rico Policy

Last summer, more than 70,000 of us wrote, called and spoke out to Demand Congress send emergency relief money to Puerto Rico despite the Trump Administration’s racist objections. More than 200 days later, and after Puerto Rico has been rocked by earthquakes left more than 8,000 people without a safe home to sleep in, Ben Carson is releasing less than half the money, and only on the conditions that Puerto Rico pay workers less than $15 an hour, and do nothing about the island’s electric grid.

The crisis is still unfolding, but one thing is clear: Trump and Ben Carson – his Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) – are using aid money Congress has already appropriated as leverage to enforce their racist, climate-denying policy agenda. Will you speak out now to stop them? Sign here to demand Trump and Carson stop illegally withholding ALL federal aid to Puerto Rico.

Sadly, this is only the latest example of how Trump combines climate denial and racism into a policy that hurts our neighbors and fellow citizens. Carson was legally required to disburse the money last September, but has been delaying the release of $18 billion that Congress appropriated for Puerto Rico. The money is supposed to upgrade infrastructure, including the islands old and fossil-fuel powered electric grid, and help mitigate and adapt to climate-fueled super storms like Maria.

Trump’s ongoing anti-Puerto Rico agenda– to deny 3.2 million Puerto Ricans funding—is based on racial and ethnic prejudice, petty politics, and a calculated agenda to beat down the island’s economy and people so banking and big real estate & development cronies can cash in. A slew of reports have shown that the island remains at great risk of natural and man-made disasters. The 2020 Global Climate Risk Index ranked Puerto Rico, along with Myanmar and Haiti, at the top of places most vulnerable to extreme weather events.

If the money had been spent on-time, it’s possible that houses, schools and the electric grid could also have been more resilient to the huge earthquakes that rocked the island in recent weeks.

Instead, HUD is releasing less than half the money – about $8 billion in emergency disaster aid funding. And that movement is only coming after intense coverage of the human suffering caused by the earthquakes, and after Congress threatened to defund all of HUD unless they answered questions.

We’re proud to fight alongside allies from the Power 4 Puerto Rico Coalition once more. Together, we demand that Carson and Trump release ALL the aid money, and stop adding ridiculous pre-conditions like how much to pay workers. Sign here if you agree and tell Trump and Carson to stop illegally blocking aid for Puerto Rico. Note – after you sign well redirect you to a page where you can chip in to support local PR groups working to rebuild after the earthquakes.

Sign Now to Demand bold protections for climate refugees

If you’re one of nearly 120,000 people who signed our petition demanding justice for climate refugees from the Bahamas, you already know that it’s time to act. Will you sign here to tell Congress to protect climate-displaced communities?

If not, here’s a quick reminder: Last September September, the Bahamas were slammed by Category 5 Hurricane Dorian. The storm killed dozens of people and left more than 70,000 Bahamians homeless.

You probably also remember that in 2017, Puerto Rico was hit by Category 5 Hurricane Maria, killing 3,000 people and leaving over $90 million in property destruction.

If you’re a close watcher of climate news, you might even have seen that, just this month, hundreds of thousands of people in Kenya, Somalia, and South Sudan have been displaced due to climate-fueled super storms and the unprecedented flooding that follows.

And yet, Donald Trump’s racist policies seek to turn away climate-displaced peoples from the Bahamas, Kenya, Sudan and other communities. He even denies disaster assistance to communities of color in Puerto Rico and California while protecting his own resorts in Florida.

It’s up to Congress to act: Sign here to tell them to pass a pair of bipartisan bills that will protect climate-displaced people from Trump’s racist policies.

These are only a few recent examples of climate-fueled disasters around the world. Storms, droughts, fires, and floods will all get more extreme as our planet tips towards climate chaos. And climate disasters are already driving a global wave of migration that will only accelerate in the coming years

We must, of course, take bold action at the local, state and federal level to reduce emissions and institute a Green new Deal. But while those solutions are enacted we must pass humanitarian protections so climate refugees are guaranteed safe passage to new communities in the U.S where they can rebuild their lives.

Time and time again, communities of color, the poor, and those in the global south are hit first and worst by climate disasters. Instead of turning away climate refugees — who are often from countries and communities least responsible for the climate crisis,– Our elected officials must step up to meet these climate refugees’ needs.

Sign if you agree: Climate refugees deserve safe passage to the U.S.

Fortunately, lawmakers who see the strong connection between migration and the climate crisis have introduced S. 2565 and H.R. 4732 to support directly-impacted communities. If passed, these two pieces of legislation would both create a designated immigration status for climate-displaced persons and would establish a global climate resiliency fund to provide humanitarian aid and relocation services.

If you’re ready to welcome climate refugees from across America and across the world into your community, please sign this petition and tell Congress it’s time to protect climate-displaced communities.

Justice for the Bahamas; Justice for climate refugees.

It’s been just over a month since the Bahamas were slammed by Hurricane Dorian. The Category 5 storm killed dozens of people and left more than 70,000 Bahamians homeless.

But when families fled for the US mainland looking for shelter and a safe place to stay while they rebuild, the Trump administration slammed the door. In one instance 119 refugees were forced off a ferry headed to Florida because they didn’t have proper Visas for the Trump administration.

Turning away Bahamian hurricane survivors is cruel and heartless. Sign now to demand that Congress pass legislation to grant Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for the Bahamas while the country rebuilds.

The solution is simple: TPS is an immigration program that provides legal status to migrants from countries that have suffered natural disasters, prolonged unrest, or conflict.

It was a standard practice of the US Government to offer TPS to natural (if that’s the right word for climate-fueled super-storms) disasters under the Clinton, W. Bush, and Obama administrations. And at one point, Trump’s own acting Customs and Border Protection chief, Mark Morgan, said it would be “appropriate” to extend TPS to Bahamians in the wake of Hurricane Dorian. But Trump lashed out against the idea, using racist and xenophobic language to block TPS for not just Bahamians, but Venezuelans, Haitians, and others he deemed “very bad people.”

If Trump and team wont act, Congress must. Congress can grant TPS to thousands of Bahamian climate refugees so they can work and live in the United States without fear of deportation. Reps. Yvette Clarke (D-NY-9), Stacey Plaskett (D-VI), and Barbara Lee’s (D-CA-13) have introduced the TPS for Victims of Hurricane Dorian Act, and five presidential candidates signed onto similar legislation in the Senate as well.

Storms, droughts and floods will only become more extreme as our planet tips towards climate chaos. And climate disasters are already driving a global wave of migration that will only accelerate in the coming years.

We must join together now to demand that Congress pass legislation that offers a humanitarian response to the growing crisis of mass climate displacement and provides relief to Bahamian hurricane survivors.

Sign the petition: Urge lawmakers to grant TPS to Bahamians displaced by Hurricane Dorian.

UPDATE: Disaster relief bill passes Congress

Thanks again for signing our petition asking Congress to pass climate-disaster relief for Puerto Rico and all Americans. Good news – thanks to your voice and the voices of more than 70,000 others – Congress voted this week to concur with the Senate’s changes and send the $19 billion disaster relief bill to Donald Trump.

But 58 Republicans still voted against the disaster relief package, insisting to the end that it exclude aid for Puerto Rico and include funding for Trump’s racist border wall. Trump, meanwhile, is galavanting around England and on Monday seemed confused about whether the Senate had already passed the bill (they did, 2 weeks ago).

One more time before Trump gets home, can you share this petition and encourage your networks online to demand Trump support climate-disaster relief for ALL Americans including Puerto Rico?

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The House passage is a big victory because it’s the first time in months Congress has put aside partisan bickering to address the unprecedented climate disasters rocking America – from Puerto Rico still struggling to recover from Hurricane Maria, to the record-setting floods in the midwest that are still disrupting planting season.

But Trump didn’t just forget about which chamber had already voted on the bill – he also forgot that he’d spent months railing against disaster funding in racist, fact-free ways. As soon as he remembers or one of those 58 Republican Trump supporters reminds him, his signature is not guaranteed.

It’s also important to put this victory in context. We started this campaign with Daily Kos, 350 dot org, Power 4 Puerto Rico and other allies because Trump was singling Puerto Rico out to not get disaster funding. Congressional negotiators were successful in getting the total aid to Puerto Rico increased from $600 million to $900 million – that’s a 50% increase over the objections of the President and nearly a third of all Republicans in the House of Representatives.

But Puerto Rico, and a lot of American Communities, need a lot more help. Our coalition estimates that Puerto Rico needs closer to $1.5 billion in relief funding – almost twice what Congress approved this week. And with midwest flooding continuing to slow planting season in the midwest, it’s likely we’ll need more aid there too before the summer is over.

The point is, in a climate changed world, it’s never been more important to demand that Congress and the President take urgent action to help Americans hit by climate-fueled storms, fires and other disasters.

This week’s vote in Congress is a good step, and a clear indication of teh work we still have to do. First, let’s make sure Trump doesn’t screw this up this progress for Puerto Rico and other communities. Then we need to keep fighting for the changes we need that will protect us all from the next climate disaster.

Just a reminder, the 2019 hurricane season started this week. Thanks for signing, please share this message to engage your networks online and spread the word. And stay tuned for more actions you can take soon.

It took a tornado in the Capitol to pass this disaster relief bill. Make sure Trump signs it

Earlier today, the Senate passed a disaster relief package that’s been held up for months by partisan bickering and Trump’s racism.

It’s an important step toward getting the billions of dollars in disaster aid that we desperately need to respond to the last two years of climate fueled super storms. Ironically, the vote happened minutes after a tornado warning sounded in the US Capitol itself, and hours after tornadoes killed at least three people in Missouri – a dark reminder that climate change is powering stronger storms all over the U.S.

But while the vote was nearly unanimous: 85 to 8 in the Senate, Trump’s support is still not guaranteed. That’s because the bill gives $19.1 billion to help communities ravaged by climate chaos – from the floods in Nebraska to wildfires in California – including $900 million for Puerto Rico to recover from Hurricane Maria.

Trump has been objecting for months to the money for Puerto Rico, and had also demanded money for his racist border wall. And all that was before he flew off the handle this week in a meeting over infrastructure and said he’d block everything until the House stops investigating his crimes and misdemeanors.

Now is the moment of truth – will you help us deliver 75,000 signatures to DC right now to force Trump to sign this climate disaster relief bill?

When Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico a year ago, more than 3,000 Americans lost their lives. Now, as Puerto Rican communities try to rebuild, Trump has continued to lie and spout racist tirades while denying Puerto Ricans access to critical federal recovery funds. Congress has taken the first step, after months of partisan gridlock, to provide Puerto Ricans with aid including funds for expanded infrastructure rebuilding efforts and food assistance programs.

Now the ball is in Trump’s court. It would be the height of grotesque racism for the president to veto the whole aid package because some U.S. citizens “deserve” help after a natural disaster more than others. And any denial or attempt to line-item veto Puerto Rico’s funds will make all our communities vulnerable the next time a disaster strikes. For decades, Congress has acted across party lines to provide disaster relief to ALL U.S. communities without prejudice or partisan bias. With another hurricane season starting earlier than ever due to climate change, it is essential that this bill to support Puerto Rican communities and prepare for future storms pass now.

Sign now to add your support and help us delivery 75,000 messages to DC to force Trump to act.

Harvey

Most of the info on this page is copied from the Harvey response page at Another Gulf Is Possible. Their page is updated more frequently – so click here for the most up to date list of what’s needed and what to do.

When Hurricane Katrina made landfall in Louisiana 12 years ago, it seared into the mind of America a simple fact about the climate crisis: Climate Change is racist.

Here’s what I mean: Even as the impacts of climate change accelerate all around us with devastating impacts (this was, for example, the third once in 500 year storm to hit Houston in the last 3 years) they always hit the poor, communities of color, and the disenfranchised first and worst. There’s a reason that the people who lived in New Orleans’ lower ninth ward ward were mostly black, and the worst hit by Katrina’s flooding 12 years ago. There’s a reason why the people living next to flooded chemical plants and refineries that are leaking and spewing toxic gasses are mostly Latino and black. And there’s a reason that climate impacts like rising sea levels, more severe storms, and increased rainfall and flooding disproportionately  impact people in the global south, and poor and minority communities here at home in America.

That reason, as eloquently described by Wen Stephenson in the nation this week, is that:

Our unfolding climate catastrophe … is rooted in social and economic inequalities that render most vulnerable the most marginalized and powerless. …[B]oth causes and deadly effects, are inescapably political—as much about our democracy as about the changes wrought upon our atmosphere. (Note to those in the media: It’s not “politicizing” a tragedy to point out that the causes of the tragedy, and responses to it, are deeply political.)

Saying so is fine and necessary. But understanding that Harvey, and all climate chaos, cary a fundamental racial and political bias is also necessary to how we respond. During and After Katrina, the Red Cross drove empty trucks around to make it look like they were busy, and raised millions of dollars that were never spent on the people who needed it most. Its just one of several examples of how that charity, in particular, mis-manages donations. Just as important, after Katrina had passed, New Orleans was gentrified, it’s school districts privatized, and it’s reconstruction benefited many of the same developers, oil, and gas companies that made a climate-fueled super storm such a disaster for the city in the first place.

Which is why we’re asking you not to give to the Red Cross and other big charities in response to Harvey. Instead, we’re directing you to a consortium of local, frontline groups fighting climate change and environmental justice fights in and around the gulf region. Our goal is a #AJustHarveyRecovery – not just a new beginning for people’s who’s homes are flooded and who lost loved ones in the storm; But a new start for the region that shows Another Gulf Is Possible.

So here’s a full list from Our friends. If you’re not sure how to split your donation over these groups, or only have a minute – you may also donate on this page we setup, and we’ll divide 100% of the donations evenly between TEJAS and the L’eau Est La Vie camp‘s pages, since we’ve worked with both groups in the past.

Gulf South Regional Resource & Support Mobilization

This webpage is being continually updated and is serving as a central information source for frontline-to-frontline direct resource & support mobilization. 

WHERE TO DONATE MONEY


RECOVERY SUPPLIES NEEDED

PERSONAL SUPPLIES

  • Basic toiletries – toothbrushes, toothpaste, period products (diva cups, pads, tampons etc), hair care, soap, lotion, talcum powder
  • Sleeping bags, pillows, blankets
  • Baby formula and baby food (MREs do not meet nutritional needs of infants), breast pumps, bottles, bottled water, diapers (cloth or disposable), carriers, strollers, car seats
  • Children’s toys, games, puzzles, cards, books
  • Water
  • Nonperishable, high nutrient density food
  • New, seasonally appropriate clothes of all sizes (for humid, hot weather)
  • Wheelchairs, walkers, canes, catheters, alcohol wipes, and “diapers” for adults/larger kids with disabilities

CLEAN UP SUPPLIES

  • Storage – plastic tubs, contractor bags, boxes, buckets, tarps, duct tape
  • Work tools – especially for demolition: hammers, axes, shovels, crowbars, tarps, screwdrivers, drills, box cutters and extra blades, crowbars, screwdrivers, drills, wheelbarrows, wire cutters, ladders
  • Cleaning supplies – heavy duty respirator masks (n95 or better), knee high rubber/rain boots, rubber gloves and thick work gloves, bleach, mops, brooms, rakes, garbage bags (especially large contractor bags), sponges, towels, heavy duty paper towels
  • Mold remediation supplies – borax, tea tree oil or vinegar are herbal products that eliminate black mold, as well as commercial “mold control”/other concrobium/ specifically mold-remediation products which tend to go quickly in affected sites.

HEALTH AND HOUSEHOLD SUPPLIES

  • Dehumidifiers, fans, flashlights, lanterns – especially solar powered
  • Solar power chargers, long-lasting/heavy duty/water-resistant power sticks, batteries of all kinds
  • Health/wellness supplies – herbal medicines/tinctures, vitamins, mosquito repellent, bandages (especially the waterproof kinds, NexCare is a good brand), gauze, medical tape (plastic and paper), medical gloves, antiseptic cleaners, pain relief, sanitizer, tweezers, muscle pain relief balms/ointments, ice packs
  • Dog food and emergency pet supplies like leashes, flea medicine
  • Large coolers, large cooler bags
  • Relevant gift cards: Home Depot, Lowes, Target, IKEA, Walgreen’s, H.E.B.

FRONTLINE DONATION DRIVE DROPOFF LOCATIONS

AIMING FOR DELIVERY ON FRIDAY 9/1

Donation Drop-Off – Monday 8/28 – Thursday 8/31 

NEW ORLEANS, LA AND SURROUNDING AREA

  • Mid-City and Gentilly
    • 3449 Roger Williams Street, 70119 – private home
      • anytime
      • Knock on door, leave donations on porch if not home/no answer
  • Bywater and Marigny
    • 609 St. Ferdinand Street, 70117- Catapult art space
      • Wednesday 12-8pm and Thursday 12-4pm
      • Blue metal warehouse next door to hot pink mosaic building; doors will be open
    • 1305 Alvar Street, 70117– private home
      • Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 9am – 9pm
      • Knock on front door
  • Uptown
    • 5206 Magazine Street, 70115 – Rank and File Books
      • call/text 504-239-7140 for drop-off

BATON ROUGE, LA AND SURROUNDING AREA

  • Garden District and Mid-City
    • 5700 Florida Blvd, Suite 110 (Florida Blvd. side of Mid City tower) – Harvest Moon Listening Room
      • Contact: Jason Hall
    • 2228 Cherokee Street, 70806 – private home
      • Leave donations on screened porch
    • 7735 N Jefferson Place Cir Apt D, 70809 – private home
      • Text 225-588-1175 for dropoff
  • Mutual Aid Disaster Relief working on locating more drop off locations

LAFAYETTE, LA AND SURROUNDING AREA

  • Breaux Bridge
    • 1545 Anse Broussard Hwy, 70517
      • Call owners Malcolm and Jodie Orgero at 337-332-4740
  • Lafayette
    • Working on locating drop off location
  • Rayne
    • Working on locating drop off location

MOBILE, AL AND SURROUNDING AREA

  • Coden
    • Coastal Response Center (https://www.facebook.com/CoastalResponseCenter/) at 7385 Hwy 188, Coden, Alabama has three trucks and three trailers that they will be filling to send to the Houston area, and they’re accepting goods for the delivery at these times this week:
      • 9am-12pm, 3pm-7pm & 7pm-10pm Tuesday
      • 9am-12pm & 3pm-7pm Wednesday
      • 9am-12pm Thursday
    • 7-10pm Tuesday will be their normal monthly fundraising concert ($6 at the door including refreshments & music) and any donors will receive a ticket for a door prize.
    • They are loading Thursday afternoon and evening and should be prepared to leave early Friday morning.

AUSTIN, TX AND SURROUNDING AREA


LOCAL FRONTLINE INFO, SUPPORT AND RESOURCES


MORE SOURCES FOR INFO

Immediate response efforts:

Other sources for information:


ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD REPORTING

TEXAS

  • Pipeline, or oil and gas related emergency
  • Air emissions *note: suspension of air quality rules and air quality monitors in effect*
    • TCEQ: 1-888-777-3186,
      • Main Number: 877-228-5740
      • Emergency Number:  1-844-773-0305

LOUISIANA

  • Pipeline, or oil and gas related emergency
  • Debris
    • LDEQ Debris Hotline: 225-364-7901

NATIONAL

  • EPA (National Response Center )
    • 1-800-424-8802

Please contact jayeesha@gmail.com if you would like to be shared on the collaborative Google document serving as the central source for content here.