2020 foresight

2020 and the new decade are not off to a very encouraging start: Australia is on fire. So is the Amazon and there was just a huge oil spill in Brazil. Puerto Rico is being rocked by earthquakes even as it struggles to get the relief money Congress appropriated, and which Trump’s racist administration still wont deliver. Trump might start a war with Iran to distract himself from Impeachment. And the blitzkrieg assault on the planet continues apace: with Trump opening new attacks on (another) one of our oldest and most effective environmental laws: the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA).

And that’s just the part of the list from the last two weeks; The first of the 2020s — a decade in which we need radical action to stop the climate crisis on a scale rarely seen in the human endeavor.

But there’s good news too: 88 people chipped in just under $1000 to support this project in December – so we’ve got the funds we need to keep writing and emailing you. New coalitions are launching and re-launching with exciting plans for a 72 hour climate strike in April to honor the 50th anniversary of Earth Day and the new generation of climate leaders. And lawsuits are advancing to honor treaty rights and stop Keystone XL, as well as to stop the Atlantic Coast Pipeline from Crossing the Appalachian trail, and much more. Not to mention the 2020 election – with primaries starting in a few weeks.

A famous phrase notes that the opposite of war isn’t peace, it’s creation; And the opposite of fear isn’t courage, it’s action. So with the pre-amble that this is very much a ‘going gets tough’ moment, here’s three key themes of our plans to get going, creating and taking action in 2020:

Redefine radical

One of the big lessons of the last three years is that things that seemed radical now have to become common. Twenty years ago we had time for incremental solutions to the climate crisis – driving less or recycling were appropriate actions for people to take when we ‘only’ needed to cut emissions by 3% a year. Now we need to cut them 15% a year, every year and those actions, any individual action really, just aren’t enough.

What we need now are big changes in big systems – electrify everything, de-carbonize the shipping industry, put millions of people to work building the new energy economy. And we absolutely have to stop building and investing in the fossil fuel projects that are literally killing us all – which means we need to be ready to put our bodies, our lives, and our collective will in the way.

As Rebecca Solnit said in a beautiful essay on the first day of this decade:

I have seen change that was unimaginable until it happened and then became so ordinary-seeming a part of everyday life that people forgot there was a struggle, forgot there was a transformation, forgot how we got here, forgot that we are living in the once-unimaginable. I believe that there are many unimaginables in this moment that will become, must become ordinary, including the end of the era of fossil fuel. Almost no one seems to know that 20 years ago, we literally did not have the solution, because wind and solar were ineffectual and expensive; we have had an energy revolution that now makes it possible to make the transition we need, and it’s not unimaginable now—just unimagined because it’s so overlooked.

https://lithub.com/letter-to-a-young-climate-activist-on-the-first-day-of-the-new-decade/

We’ll try and embody this goal in 2020 by focussing on more & more escalated actions to stop fossil fuels. We’ll still have online petitions for you to sign, from time to time, but we’ll try and pair each and every one with a specific, in-person delivery event. Where possible we’ll also try and have a way for you to participate no matter what zip code you live in. And at big moments like the April climate strikes we’ll focus our attention on the second day of action –

Creation & social media

Another key lesson from the last few years is not to underestimate the value and role of art and creativity in our work, and also the importance of co-creation: of building things together. There’s just something so authentic and powerful about painting a banner together, singing a song together, assembling the lock box together. You’re not just talking about community, you’re literally making it.

By contrast, at the same time we’ve been re-learning the value of creating together, we’ve seen the utter failure of social media as a space for community building. The last few years took us from Tahrir square and digitally-powered movements that toppled dictators, to the Trump administration and the era of paid disinformation as a Facebook ad policy.

As Zeynep Tufekci said in this must-read article from last year:

What is to be done? There are no easy answers. More important, there are no purely digital answers. …The way forward is not to cultivate nostalgia for the old-world information gatekeepers or for the idealism of the Arab Spring. It’s to figure out how our institutions, our checks and balances, and our societal safeguards should function in the 21st century—not just for digital technologies but for politics and the economy in general. This responsibility isn’t on Russia, or solely on Facebook or Google or Twitter. It’s on us.

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/611806/how-social-media-took-us-from-tahrir-square-to-donald-trump/

That article was gutting for me because I spent the last 10 years trying to use tech tools to expand democracy and movement building in the US. The original idea of 198 methods was to update Gene Sharp’s anti-fascist methodology to use modern, digital tools like social media.

But we’re going to try and use Tufekci’s advice in 2020 by building the communities we need, not idealizing the ones we could have had. In particular we’re committing to building a curriculum of direct action training tools online. After 2 years of ignoring Facebook and other big social platforms, we’re also going to take another shot at using it to create authentic, multi-directional conversation through live video chats and Instagram stories. And of course we’ll keep, texting, emailing and continuing to reply to all the messages you write (eventually, and not counting the trolls).

Your vote matters, but it’s not enough

Last thought, since this is a very consequential election year, is about the 2020 election. Like social media, we’re forced to admit that we don’t live in the world we want, or have the things we need. But we also see that we can create them.

Specifically, we’re forced to confront these two facts:

  1. Defeating Trump and his corrupt, climate-wrecking administration in 2020 is incredibly important. No single thing will make as much of an impact on the climate as removing this regime from power.
  2. Our election system is deeply broken: Trump won without the popular vote, and millions of our fellow citizens are already disenfranchised by bogus redistricting, an arrest or incarceration record, and lots of other racist features of our system.

We have to vote. Everyone we know has to vote. And we have to spend time and resources (as best we’re allowed as a non-profit group) making sure people are registered, informed, and able to exercise their right to vote. But that simply can’t be the sum of our work.

No politician can be elected to save us. We have to save ourselves.

Too many things need to happen while the campaign is ongoing – from fighting Trump’s NEPA rollback, to pressing Congress and the Courts to act and hold Trump’s corrupt regime accountable, to building intentional and creative communities of action to stop pipelines.

And no matter who is elected at the end of this year, we need to keep pushing – because we only have this one last decade to make big changes in every part of our society. To change everything, it will take all of us, pushing everywhere.

So that’s our plan for 2020 in a nutshell: take radical action that reflects the urgency of the climate crisis; begin again with the project of using digital tools to build creative, connected action with people; And pay attention to the 2020 election and politics, without getting consumed or distracted by it.

IMPEACH!

198 methods was born out of the ‘election’ of Donald Trump. It seemed clear, three years ago, that we needed new kinds of action and campaigning. Trump represents all our worst fears of fossil-fueled-fascism.

Now, for a moment, he’s being held accountable for (some) of his mis-deeds. Only two presidents have ever been impeached by the House of Representatives. The evidence against Trump is clear and unequivocal – whatever he and his cronies may spin or say about it on Fox News. This is one of those moments history remembers – and remembers where we were.

So don’t sit on the sidelines. Join the tens of thousands of people on Tuesday, December 17. Together we’ll ensure every member of Congress sees that the public supports impeachment right before they vote.

The quick plan is for people to gather at every congressional office and town square in America. Most of the events are after work – around 5 or 6 local time, and all of them are family friendly, peaceful, and solemn. More than 500 events are planned already, and more keep getting added to the map every hour.

Make sure you R.S.V.P. and then share the event with your friends and family.

This is our last chance to show Congress and Trump that the people won’t stand for corruption, high crimes, or abuse of power before the House votes. Let’s tell Congress to do their duty to impeach and remove Trump because nobody is above the law.

Click here to find an event near you, R.S.V.P., and then invite your friends, family, and neighbors.

Shut. It. Down. Dream Act Now.

There’s a principle in direct action called “shutting things down to open them up.” The basic idea is that since we know “power concedes nothing without a demand,” sometimes you have to shut something down in order to open up a conversation about the moral harm it creates.

This week, there’s a critical opportunity to demand Congress take action – or else shut down the whole government. And we need your help:

Congress has until Friday to pass a spending bill that will keep the government open — including the rogue deportation department called ICE — and we’re working in solidarity with a team that is demanding they say #NoDreamNoDeal and include a clean Dream Act. Anything less is a vote to fund the deportation of hundreds of our brothers and sisters who have lived here their whole lives.

Why is a climate action group working to pass the Dream Act? For two reasons:

  1. It’s about solidarity: In addition to being the right, moral thing to do, climate change and immigration ARE linked issues. As rising seas, extreme weather, and fights political and military create more and more refugees (including here in the US) we’re going to need smart, compassionate laws like the Dream Act. Just as important, these young undocumented Dreamers are essential to the fight to solve climate change — they’re showing up at protests, inventing better and cheaper solar panels, and doing the work we need young people to do.
  2. It’s a test for Congress: Climate change and the Dream Act have nearly identical political problems: huge majorities of voters support action, but Congress is slow to act. And too often, our so-called allies are quick to compromise and delay, when they need to stand and fight. We’ve seen this over and over again in the last 12 months as Congress, including Democrats who claim to be progressives, vote to confirm Trump’s nominees to the EPA, Department of Interior, FERC and other agencies. Just last month, the House Democrats stuck to their guns and refused to pass a spending bill without a Dream Act, but a handful of Senate Democrats buckled under pressure and gave Trump a victory (during which time he held a confused meeting about immigration, then made his infamous “Shithole” remark).We can’t let that happen again. We need to start sending the message to so-called progressive politicians that it’s not enough to talk tough about Trump and ask us to vote for you or your party. We need you to be willing to shut things down in order to make progress — just as we are.

Click here to host or join a #NoDreamNoDeal rally near you this week.
OR

Click here or call 202-224-3121 and tell your Senators and Representative not to vote for ANY spending bill UNLESS it includes a clean Dream Act (the free click to call tool is sponsored by our allies at United We Dream).

Here’s the back-story on the Dream Act

On September 5, Donald Trump repealed the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. His decision strips children who were brought here illegally, called Dreamers, of their ability to live, learn, and work. Everyday Congress refuses to act 122 Dreamers lose their protection from deportation.

So this week thousands of us will rise up and demand that our Representatives and Senators across the country make a choice and support Dreamers and a clean Dream Act. Please join us at a Wednesday or Thursday action near you – click here for details and to RSVP. If there’s not one near you, there’s still time to organize a quick rally or photo event with friends. The more visibility we have—even small events—the stronger our voice.

We know that the public does not support the deportation of 800,000 immigrant youth who are doctors, lawyers, activists, and people who make our communities wonderful places to.

Join us to tell our government that we are not bargaining chips – a Clean Dream Act must be part of any spending bill: